Tea house moving forward again

Since I last posted  about the “Stabbur” project not to much have happened with the project. I was distracted be the urge to first get a propper bathroom inside the main house, then to make sure the main building was properly drained. Since that last drainage activity was quicker than anticipated I was left with a two day vacation to try to get something done on the Tea house. During the summer I was able to finish ut the south wall of the “Stabbur,” as shown in the first photo.

This Thursday to Sunday is dedicated to the Tea house. Some work had perviously been done on the west wall so I decided to start with that.

Thursday saw the lower part to completion. Friday I started tearing down the old planks of the upper section, then reconstructing the wall according to modern building practice. I added more support beams, and covered up with huge boards 120cm x 240xm that i designed to keep the wind out and also give some insulation. These was then covered with a water resistant layer. Finished it of with small 1” x 2” that I later will attache the planks too. This allows air to circulate between the water/wind layer and the wooden planks preventing rot.

I’ll keep updating this post over the weekend, so look back if your interested in following the progress.

Elevating the tea House to New heights

It has been a while since I have had time to work on the tea house. I found some immediate problems with the cabin’s main building that I had to repair. My dad came out to help me with that, but we also got time to do some work on the tea house 🙂

We added boards underneath the building, to prevent a draft from coming up trough the floor. The idea is that the insulation will rest directly on these boards. Also we prepared the floorboards inside the house. Next weekend I hope to be able to add insulation and seal the floor up.

While doing all, this my dad discovered that the building was crooked. Using his engineering skills he discovered that the NE corner needed to be lifted 4cm and the NW corner 7.5 cm.

The very next day I ran out and bought at jack meant to lift cars. I inserted it underneath the beams of the tea house and lifted it up enough so that I could insert a wooden board between the beam and the concrete pillars that it was resting on. That way I was able to lift the NE corner 3 cm and the NW corner 6 cm. Measuring inside, the tea house was almost perfectly level after this operation. I’m a bit proud, I have never elevated a building before 🙂

Finally I was able to go the lumberyard and pick up all the exterior wood. I bought Siberian Larch. Supposedly this can stand untreated for a hundred years. It’s a huge pile of wood, and it is going to require a lot of work to get it onto the building.

 

Storehouse to Teahouse

Since the Chabarn ended up being too expensive, I have started a smaller project. At my cabin, there is a small storehouse (“stabbur” in Norwegain), that I am going to turn into a combined Tea-house and guest-house. I’m looking at three mats and a 80cm by 320cm mizu-ya.  But first I need to renovate the building. I have started to demolish most of what was there originally, and intend to keep the frame only.

During my six day vacation, I was able to remove all the interior wood. This was a lot more work than I had planned for. I removed the interior walls on the ground floor, as well as in the loft. In addition, I tore down the interior part of the roof, along with the floor between ground floor and the loft. See attached photos of the huge pile of removed wood.

The wood I removed on the first day, was all burned on my Easter-pyre, but the rest is left for another day.

I was able to replace the entire south wall, and half of the west one. I removed the old planks and replaced it with wood fiber boards, and a layer of soft wind barrier, that also happens to be water and vapor proof. In reality, this is the wall, but to protect the barrier and to make it more appealing to the eye, one would normally add wooden boards. I’m going to do this, but I didn’t have the wood available, so I haven’t started on that task yet. in the photos you will see a network of 1” by 2” beams that have been nailed on top of the wind barriers, this is to get some air between the barrier and the wood. In all essence this is the way most Norwegian wooden houses are built.

 

The Dream

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Burning Dreams

I had a dream that went up in flames. After a lengthy process, I got some price quotes for building the Tea barn. Unfortunately, they were two-to-three times higher than expected. This makes it impossible for me to build the barn. :'(

I’m currently working on some other plans that might be more affordable. Last month, the government announced a change in building policies, starting from July this year. With these new laws, I can build more without applying for building permit. I have a small storehouse, and after the government announced their new policies, I started dreaming about turning this into a mizu-ya, and build an almost identical Tea room next to it. I even envisioned a corridor between the two so the host wouldn´t be bothered with rain when going from one to the other.

We are spending Easter at the cabin, and the first thing I did was start measuring. Turns out, the storehouse is so high that I would not be able to build an identical building even within the new laws. So while I am looking for other ways to build my dream Tea house, in the meantime I have decided to upgrade the old storehouse, making it a Tea house with a tiny mizu-ya. That way I have a nice place to practice Tea while I ponder the best way to build my Tea house.