Tabidansu

d1I do not know why, but I have a fascination with boxes in relation to Tea. I love dogu that has a wooden box, I love chabako, I love satsubako, and I love tabidansu. I would like to share some information about the last one.

Tana is the Japanese word used to describe a small table or stand that is used in Tea. The stand can have one or more shelves and is used to place various utensils on. This changes the way the host prepare Tea. Tabidansu is a tana. As you can see from the image on the right, tabidanus is shaped like a wooden box, with two internal shelves.

The first tabidansu is said to be a warriors box for storing armour. With a small handle on each side for ease of carry. On the front there is a simple locking mechanism. It is said that Rikyu used a tabidansu at the battle of Odawara.

In many ways tabidansu is “just” another tana. But for me it holds a special place. I like the way it looks especially for usucha. It is placed next the the kettle all neat and closed, like it was always standing this way. After you have made tea you put it back exactly the same.  The temae is over, but the room is ready for the next guest. 

Tabidansu is 33.8cm wide, 26.7cm deep, and 44.7cm high. It is usually created made of unfinished paulownia wood. The midle shelf is removable and can be used as a stand for utensils when doing temae on grass. There is a very similar tana called Yachiyo-dana, which is lacquered in red, this tana was designed by Tantansais wife Kayoko.

Temae notes:

  • Koicha: When starting the temae the tabidansu is open. Mizusashi has been pulled forward. Chaire is placed infront of mizusashi as usuall.
  • Koicha: At the end refill mizusashi as usuall with tana, then move it back into the tabidansu and close the door of the tabidansu.
  • Usucha: When starting the temae the tabidansu is closed. When entering with the chawan open it up, and pull mizusashi forward before taking out the natsume.
  • Usucha: At the end refill the mizusashi as usuall, then move it back into the tabidansu. Do not close the door. When bringing back the haiken-dogu you will place the natsume inside, and the chashaku ontop. Then close the tabidansu, and take the chashaku with you as you leave.
Is it usefull to add a short note like this about the procedural things at the end of a post like this? Please let me know in the comment field below.

Chado Encyclopedia – Ceramic update

Oni Hagi chawan by Miwa Kyusetsu
Oni Hagi chawan by Miwa Kyusetsu

The different styled of ceramic was never my strongest area of expertise, in fact I’m quite poor at it. Therefore that has been one of the areas that the Chado Encyclopedia has had some weak articles until now. Through community contribution wiki.chado.no now has much better information about different types of ceramic. We got many nice pictures displaying different types of ceramic along with short text explaining the main attributes of that type of ceramic.

The following pages has been updated with new images:

If you have a photo that we can use, or some knowledge of Tea please share! Do not let technology stop you. Contact me and I’ll help getting your contribution posted.

Hakkedana

tana2Living in a country where there are no professional teacher, and not even a very active chado association. I´m limited to study with the dogu I own. Since leaving Kyoto in 2005 I have only had access to a very limited selection of tana. I have a maru joku that I made my self based on the measurements I took while in Japan 2003. I also have a koko-dana and a daisu.

With this in mind I ordered a tana that tana1can be assembled in eight different ways. This will allow me to study the use of eight different tana with out needing to buys them individually or even store them individually. I think this is a great invention. The image above shows the different pieces the tana consist of, while the image below shows one of the possible ways to assemble it.

I planning to put to gather a page on http://wiki.chado.no describing how to use it in the different assemblies. I hope that some of you will help me get this correct.

The only thing that I´m a bit skeptical to is that it is kiji, that is unlacquered wood. It seems a bit silly to have a piece of okeiko dogu that can so easily be stained.

The tana documentation project, 2

This weekend I finally had some time to start on the tana project. I have updated the Tana page with more general20070129-20070129-IMG_2663a information about ko-dana and I have created detailed pages for Koko-dana and Maru-Joku.
Furthermore, I created a new page with a list of all the Konomi that I found during the research. Having made the Konomi list, I decided that this information should also be available under each tea master, so I included it under Rikyu, Sotan and Gengensai. This way, a small part of the Konomi page is shown at the bottom of each of the pages about the tea mastersand it is updated automatically.

I hope you find this information useful, and that you will continue to contribute to the project. There are still many tanas to document. I do not own more tanas myself, and will therefore be unable to take photos of any other tana. If you have access to a tana, I would greatly appreciate if you would take images of it, if possible with other utensils placed correctly inside.

The tana documentation project

As part of the Chado Encyclopedia I wish to make a new section about tana. I hope to create a separate page for each tana. The goal is to collect the following information about each of them:

  • Image of the tana, without any dogu in it.
  • Image of the tana with dogu inside, placed correctly for different situations.
  • A short text about the history of the tana.
  • A list of variations on this tana, and who has taken each of them as konomi
  • A description of how to use the tana in different situations. Always including at least Shozumi, Koicha and Usucha

I’m hoping that some of you may be able to help me with this endevour. If you have any of the above items for any tana, including daisu, tabidansu and such, I would greatly appreciate it if you could send them to me on tana @ froisland.no and give me permission to use it on http://wiki.chado.no

The tana documentation project

20050313-20050313-DSCN0695As part of the Chado Encyclopedia I wish to make a new section about tana. I hope to create a separate page for each tana. The goal is to collect the following information about each of them:

  • Image of the tana, without any dogu in it.
  • Image of the tana with dogu inside, placed correctly for different situations.
  • A short text about the history of the tana.
  • A list of variations on this tana, and who has taken each of them as konomi
  • A description of how to use the tana in different situations. Always including at least Shozumi, Koicha and Usucha

I’m hoping that some of you may be able to help me with this endevour. If you have any of the above items for any tana, including daisu, tabidansu and such, I would greatly appreciate it if you could send them to me on tana @ froisland.no and give me permission to use it on http://wiki.chado.no