Tea video

Image courtesy of zirconicusso at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Image courtesy of zirconicusso at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

In this post I’m not going to say much, just list some videos I like about tea.

Tea Duet, Urasenke and Ueda Shoko, 9:59 long: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pDQqJhoE3_A

NHK program about Chanoyu, part 1: 15:00 long: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y__ejhB7cIQ

NHK program about Chanoyu, part 1: 13:00 long: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q64lIbq487A

NHK program about tea rooms: 5:01 long: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PaV22Js3GLo&app=desktop

Usucha, 1:55 long: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c_hQeyj_wiw

Chakai 11:42 long: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gRglIqMH7H0

Japanology – Japanese Tea Ceremony 28:59 long: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sHDhjVd1XX0#t=62

Tea presentation in San Fransisco https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O4tEdaNmwzA

Tea presentation at TED http://www.tedxtokyo.com/en/talk/ryotaro-matsumura/

Tea Guarden 05:00 long: https://youtu.be/K63H8HNPaFk

Kintsugi: 3:36 long: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k3mZgs0vkDY

 

Day 200 and the bowl that was

2015-05-21 07.29.30Last week, I reached a new milestone in my morning tea project – I have now done temae 200 days in a row. I did not do anything special for this day, but I did have an accident instead. While I was taking the koicha tea bowl off the shelf, I managed to bump it into another Tea bowl that came tumbling out of the shelf and crashed into my freshwater container. So, in addition to a broken Tea bowl, I also now have a mizusashi with some awful scratches on the lid.

I’m going to try make the tea bowl that was into the tea bowl that is. To accomplish this,  I will try my hands at kintsugi (repairing with lacquer and gold).

The main concept of this technique is that you glue the pieces together using lacquer and some other medium like flour. This creates a solid binding of the pieces. You have two options for finish. You can either add a top layer of lacquer and polish this, or you can add a layer of lacquer and sprinkle it with metal dust. The dust will spread out in the lacquer and it will look like the repair was done with metal instead of lacquer.

Actually, I won´t be doing kin-tsugi, but rather “tin”-tsugi since I’m using tin and not gold to do the repair (gold was too expensive for my very first try at this technique). Tin will give the end product a look like highly polished silver.

We talked a little bit about Tea repair in one of our podcasts, and there are some pictures here if you want to see the technique in use. My Tea teacher, who is also a co-host on the podcast, has some experience with Tea repair (the pictures I linked to are all his projects). So I talked to him, to get some advise and to figure out what equipment I would need.

I ordered all the necessary items from the Watanabe web page. I ordered A01, A03, B06, F01, F03, F13, K53, and E02 – I hope that is all I need. It was easy to order, I just e-mailed them the list of products that I wanted, gave them my address and said I wanted to pay with PayPal. The very next day I got a invoice,  and hopefully soon I will have the utensils 🙂

I will be posting my progress under the label. Just click the link and you’ll find all the posts

Some online resources

A step by step guide:

http://www.kintugi.com/honurushi-kintsugi-step-1/

A few nice videos:

https://www.youtube.com/user/togeii/videos

 

Elevating the tea House to New heights

It has been a while since I have had time to work on the tea house. I found some immediate problems with the cabin’s main building that I had to repair. My dad came out to help me with that, but we also got time to do some work on the tea house 🙂

We added boards underneath the building, to prevent a draft from coming up trough the floor. The idea is that the insulation will rest directly on these boards. Also we prepared the floorboards inside the house. Next weekend I hope to be able to add insulation and seal the floor up.

While doing all, this my dad discovered that the building was crooked. Using his engineering skills he discovered that the NE corner needed to be lifted 4cm and the NW corner 7.5 cm.

The very next day I ran out and bought at jack meant to lift cars. I inserted it underneath the beams of the tea house and lifted it up enough so that I could insert a wooden board between the beam and the concrete pillars that it was resting on. That way I was able to lift the NE corner 3 cm and the NW corner 6 cm. Measuring inside, the tea house was almost perfectly level after this operation. I’m a bit proud, I have never elevated a building before 🙂

Finally I was able to go the lumberyard and pick up all the exterior wood. I bought Siberian Larch. Supposedly this can stand untreated for a hundred years. It’s a huge pile of wood, and it is going to require a lot of work to get it onto the building.

 

Storehouse to Teahouse

Since the Chabarn ended up being too expensive, I have started a smaller project. At my cabin, there is a small storehouse (“stabbur” in Norwegain), that I am going to turn into a combined Tea-house and guest-house. I’m looking at three mats and a 80cm by 320cm mizu-ya.  But first I need to renovate the building. I have started to demolish most of what was there originally, and intend to keep the frame only.

During my six day vacation, I was able to remove all the interior wood. This was a lot more work than I had planned for. I removed the interior walls on the ground floor, as well as in the loft. In addition, I tore down the interior part of the roof, along with the floor between ground floor and the loft. See attached photos of the huge pile of removed wood.

The wood I removed on the first day, was all burned on my Easter-pyre, but the rest is left for another day.

I was able to replace the entire south wall, and half of the west one. I removed the old planks and replaced it with wood fiber boards, and a layer of soft wind barrier, that also happens to be water and vapor proof. In reality, this is the wall, but to protect the barrier and to make it more appealing to the eye, one would normally add wooden boards. I’m going to do this, but I didn’t have the wood available, so I haven’t started on that task yet. in the photos you will see a network of 1” by 2” beams that have been nailed on top of the wind barriers, this is to get some air between the barrier and the wood. In all essence this is the way most Norwegian wooden houses are built.