Tea house moving forward again

Since I last posted  about the “Stabbur” project not to much have happened with the project. I was distracted be the urge to first get a propper bathroom inside the main house, then to make sure the main building was properly drained. Since that last drainage activity was quicker than anticipated I was left with a two day vacation to try to get something done on the Tea house. During the summer I was able to finish ut the south wall of the “Stabbur,” as shown in the first photo.

This Thursday to Sunday is dedicated to the Tea house. Some work had perviously been done on the west wall so I decided to start with that.

Thursday saw the lower part to completion. Friday I started tearing down the old planks of the upper section, then reconstructing the wall according to modern building practice. I added more support beams, and covered up with huge boards 120cm x 240xm that i designed to keep the wind out and also give some insulation. These was then covered with a water resistant layer. Finished it of with small 1” x 2” that I later will attache the planks too. This allows air to circulate between the water/wind layer and the wooden planks preventing rot.

I’ll keep updating this post over the weekend, so look back if your interested in following the progress.

Begin with Ryakubon

Back in 2009, I wrote a post titled Why begin with Ryakubon. Here, I wondered whether it would not be better for new students to start learning Irekodate instead of the traditional Ryakubon. The ease of transition from Irekote to Hakobi, and my own experience of starting with Hakobi usucha were my main reasons for preferring Irekodate as a starting point.

Ryakubon vs IrekodateRyakubon vs Irekodate

Now I’m actually considering taking on some new students, and this made me reconsider the topic. Earlier this year, I timed most of my teamaes for a while. I found that Ryakubon takes me 7 minutes to perform, while Irekodate takes 15 minutes. I was very surprised that Irekodate takes twice as long. I always imagined the difference to be much less.

I also made a rough list of the main warigeiko topics related to each of the temaes. This was just a way for me to compare the complexity of the temae. As you can see from my list, Irekodata has almost twice as many warigeiko points as Ryakubon.

These findings convinced me that there are good reasons to start with Ryakubon. I decided to stick to this traditional startingpoint for learning Tea, and I will start new students off with Ryakubon.

 

 

Tea video

Image courtesy of zirconicusso at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Image courtesy of zirconicusso at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

In this post I’m not going to say much, just list some videos I like about tea.

Tea Duet, Urasenke and Ueda Shoko, 9:59 long: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pDQqJhoE3_A

NHK program about Chanoyu, part 1: 15:00 long: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y__ejhB7cIQ

NHK program about Chanoyu, part 1: 13:00 long: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q64lIbq487A

NHK program about tea rooms: 5:01 long: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PaV22Js3GLo&app=desktop

Usucha, 1:55 long: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c_hQeyj_wiw

Chakai 11:42 long: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gRglIqMH7H0

Japanology – Japanese Tea Ceremony 28:59 long: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sHDhjVd1XX0#t=62

Tea presentation in San Fransisco https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O4tEdaNmwzA

Tea presentation at TED http://www.tedxtokyo.com/en/talk/ryotaro-matsumura/

Tea Guarden 05:00 long: https://youtu.be/K63H8HNPaFk

Kintsugi: 3:36 long: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k3mZgs0vkDY

 

Day 200 and the bowl that was

2015-05-21 07.29.30Last week, I reached a new milestone in my morning tea project – I have now done temae 200 days in a row. I did not do anything special for this day, but I did have an accident instead. While I was taking the koicha tea bowl off the shelf, I managed to bump it into another Tea bowl that came tumbling out of the shelf and crashed into my freshwater container. So, in addition to a broken Tea bowl, I also now have a mizusashi with some awful scratches on the lid.

I’m going to try make the tea bowl that was into the tea bowl that is. To accomplish this,  I will try my hands at kintsugi (repairing with lacquer and gold).

The main concept of this technique is that you glue the pieces together using lacquer and some other medium like flour. This creates a solid binding of the pieces. You have two options for finish. You can either add a top layer of lacquer and polish this, or you can add a layer of lacquer and sprinkle it with metal dust. The dust will spread out in the lacquer and it will look like the repair was done with metal instead of lacquer.

Actually, I won´t be doing kin-tsugi, but rather “tin”-tsugi since I’m using tin and not gold to do the repair (gold was too expensive for my very first try at this technique). Tin will give the end product a look like highly polished silver.

We talked a little bit about Tea repair in one of our podcasts, and there are some pictures here if you want to see the technique in use. My Tea teacher, who is also a co-host on the podcast, has some experience with Tea repair (the pictures I linked to are all his projects). So I talked to him, to get some advise and to figure out what equipment I would need.

I ordered all the necessary items from the Watanabe web page. I ordered A01, A03, B06, F01, F03, F13, K53, and E02 – I hope that is all I need. It was easy to order, I just e-mailed them the list of products that I wanted, gave them my address and said I wanted to pay with PayPal. The very next day I got a invoice,  and hopefully soon I will have the utensils 🙂

I will be posting my progress under the label. Just click the link and you’ll find all the posts

Some online resources

A step by step guide:

http://www.kintugi.com/honurushi-kintsugi-step-1/

A few nice videos:

https://www.youtube.com/user/togeii/videos